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Petition of John O'Donnell of Limerick and John Bouchier of the County of Clare 1761

12/07/1820

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Petition of John O'Donnell of Limerick and John Bouchier of the County of Clare 1761

Date of Article: 12/07/1820
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OF FREEMEN OF LIMERICK, & c. ( 1761.) 15 money to be returned, alleging he was not to be governed by the schedule or him; that he was refused by the mayor and town clerk permission to inspect the corpora- tion books, though he applied for the same, at the desire of a great body of the citizens, and though he is a freeman of the said city ; that he made a complaint to Arthur Roche when mayor, that the toll- gatherers took from a poor woman for seven pounds of fresh butter one- halfpenny gateage, and one halfpenny standing; that the mayor re- fused to redress the complaint, declaring it was no more than the just toll; that he was in the court of D Oyer Hundred, on the nineteenth of October last, that the mayor was required to put the question upon several resolutions which had passed the council, and particularly the vote of credit, but the mayor refused, and likewise refused to let a common speaker be chosen, that the lands let to Arthur Roche by the corporation, are worth 300/. a year; the lands demised to Mr Ingram, were worth at the time of the demise 701, a year; that Parteen causeway is a bad causeway, that the tide at springs overflows it, and it is dangerous; that he has heard and believes that the lands granted by theEarl of Thomond for keeping said causeway in repair, contain about forty acres; that they are about a quarter of a mile distant from the city of Limerick, and are worth two guineas an acre. Alderman Francis Sarjent being examined, said, He was mayor for the year commencing Michaelmas one thousand seven hundred and fifty- nine, that at the canting at the gates and tolls, the deputy clerk of the markets, John Smyth, gave him a paper, which he said he got from his predecessor, Mr. Baylie, giving an account of the weight to be taken out of each quarter or Limerick barrel of corn, upon which ( he said) he read the paper, but being asked by your Committee, whether he had the paper, he said he had it not, that he lost it upon removing out of the mayoralty house; that when he read the paper aloud in the court of D'Oyer Hundred, he de- clared that three pounds twelve ounces was to be taken out of each quarter of wheat; that he did not recollect what quantity he directed to be taken out of any other kind of grain ; that he believed he was asked whether it was out of the Bristol or Winchester barrel, and he answered that it was out of the Limerick barrel or quarter; that he did not recollect that any thing farther passed upon the subject, but after- wards he said he did recollect, that to the best of his memory he told them, that the toll of the gate was one halfpenny for every twenty stone of wheat, and that he was informed that if a bag weighed thirty stones, it should pay three farthings; that there were scales brought into the court of D'Oyer Hundred, he believed by his direc- tions, but he did not remember whether he gave such directions before he went into court or after, or who brought said scales into court, that he believed, he by the advice of the clerk of the markets, directed some wheat to be brought into court, and that such advice was given to him before he came into court, that he directed three pounds twelve ounces of wheat to be weighed in the court, that he did not understand the subject, but was entirely directed by the clerk of the markets, that he had no reason whatsoever to direct three pounds twelve ounces of wheat to be weighed in court, being entirely ignorant of the subject, but that Mr. Smyth, the clerk of the markets, desired him to do it; that he had the paper which he read in the court house, pinned up in his office in the mayoralty house, that he was positive he read it once after he left the court- house, but was not that he read it more than once, that he believed he might have read it several times, but did not recollect that he did, that he did not recollect upon what occasion or for what purpose he read it, or at what time he read it, except that it was during the time he was in the mayor- alty house, that he believed that the toll- gatherers took three pounds twelve ounces out of each Bristol barrel of wheat, but no complaint was made of it to him during his mayoralty; that the mayor for the time being, is clerk of the markets, that Mr. John Smyth has been for several years last past deputy clerk of the markets, that he believed there have been great frauds committed in the markets, that he visited the meat- market every week, that he has often seen blown meat exposed to sale there, and also good meat; that he never saw veal there that was not blown, that he believed there has been some blown meat in the market every day in the year, but that during his mayoralty, he seized or cut all that was blown, that he had argued with the deputy clerk of the markets, insisting upon it that meat was blown, and he insisted it was not; that he believed the deputy clerk of the market did not do his duty in taking up blown meat, that he did not believe either the late mayor or his deputy did their duty as clerks of the market, that he could not say as to his knowledge or belief, whether the assize of bread was varied during the last mayor- alty, but believed there was a variation of one penny a stone in the price of wheat 270. during
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