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The Weekly Pacquet of Advice from Rome : or The History of Popery

06/04/1683

Printer / Publisher: J. Astwood 
Volume Number: 5    Issue Number: 33
No Pages: 8
The Weekly Pacquet of Advice from Rome : or The History of Popery page 1
 
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The Weekly Pacquet of Advice from Rome : or The History of Popery

Date of Article: 06/04/1683
Printer / Publisher: J. Astwood 
Address: 
Volume Number: 5    Issue Number: 33
No Pages: 8
Sourced from Dealer? No
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C 2 5 7 3 flitawftn. The Weekly Pacquet O F t from % mt: O R , The Hiftory of P O P E R Y , &> c. Ctie mm saoittroe. F R I D A Y , April 6. i 6 8 3. Superftitio Error in farms est, amandos timet, quos coin, violat. Qjdd enim Interest, utrum Deos neges, an Infanies ? Seneca Epift. 123. A further Difplay 0 / S U P E R S T I T I O N : The Heinoufnep ef that Sin, & c. " E proceed in our Difcourfe of Superftition, three occafions we ipecified laft week ( amongft other things ) why the fame waS more fpreading than Prophanenefs, and now addrefs our felves to the fourth Reafon thereof. 4. Which is, becaufe there is in it more Credit and applaufe from men; I mean, not only more than can be looked for in Prophanenefs, ( which, as bad as the World is, is yet liable to Difhonour, and ill fpoken of almoft by all, how much foever pradifed ) but even more than can be acquir'd by doing things Commanded: For to perform the Duties required by God ( at leaft for the outward A f t , and moft men look no further ) is vulgar, and common to every ProfefTor of Religion } but he that tranfeends Commands, and Worfhips God with voluntary Worfhip, with affefted Humility and Abjeftion of himfelf, is the Saint of Hypocrites, and the Angel of Ignorant men : This K k is C 2 5 8 I rs eafily obfervable, that thofe that were exafteft in Ceremonials, ( whether God's or their own, but rather their own ) tho guilty often iri Morals, carryed a Way the Credit in the World? from them that were more exaft in Morals and equally punctual in Ceremonials of Gods prefcribing: Zachary and Elizabeth, that walktinall the Ordinances of God without Rebuke, were not in half that Reputation that the Pharifees were, who did exceed in Obfervation of their own Traditions: Nay, our Blejfed Saviour himfelf, tho moft exaft in all the Commands of God, could not win f © much Credit and Applaufe as the Pharifess had in thofe times ; and thefe Pharifees had no better way ( as they thought) to fupprefs the growing fame of him and his Difciples, than to lay upon them this Imputation of want of Devotion in not obferving the Traditions of the Elders. 5. Becaule as Ceremonials are eafier to difpatch than Morals, fo thofe Ceremonials which themfelves invented, they can more eafily and more exactly perform, than fuch as are of Gods prefcribing. How eafie a thing it was to Sacrifice a Beafi ? but how hard to Mortifie a Luft ? how facile a matter to wafh their hands, and the outfides of their Pots, and Cups, and Difhes ? but how difficult to clean fe their Hearts from Rapine and Extortion ? how ready a Bufinefs is it to Boxv the Body with feveir- al Poftures, Gefticulations, and Counter- marches, but how ievere a Task to Bow the Soul to Gods Commands ? The truth is, Superstition, tho it feem a bufy,. yet it is but a lazy thing; like fome litherly and idle Servants, who are very quick. about letter matters, but remifs enough in Affairs of greater weight and Labour j Nay, therefore double diligent in trifles, that they may exempt themfelves from harder work: So fuperftitious Hypocrites fometimes tire themfelves, and as it were weary God with Rituals, that they may flip their Necks from harder Services. Befides there is another confiderable thing in the Gale, their own Devices they can, and know they can exaftly perform j but things of Gods prefcription are very hard, if not for the Matter, yet for Manner to be accomplifht. Hence they find juft caufe to be humbled in their beft Performances of Gods Commands, as failing and falling fhort oFwhar was Commanded, but they find Caufe to applaud themfelves, and to glory in their own devifcd Services, becaufe they have punftually per,- Smn'd them. dL L a f t l y ,, 6. Laftly, Becaufe the moft wicked and Profane defire not to feem fuch, but rather endeavour to find out Figg- leaves to cover their Profanenefs : Herod tho he intended Murther, pretended Worfhip unto Chrift\ Jez. abel that meant to fwallow down Naboths Vineyard procIaimsaF^ themorefeemingly Devour men are at Church, the lefs they are fufpe& ed to be wicked at home or abroad j who would imagine to find a JViddovps Houfe in the Bowels of a long- fraying Pharifee ? or to meet with Rapine and Extortion in , a waflit and fcoured Difh ? who would think that a man that Bows conftantly at the Syllables of the Name of jESVS, would commonly fwear by the Name of God or Chrift, or challenge Omnipotency to Damn him ? who would look to fee thofe that Bow fo much, fo oft before the Altar, fo ftiff to yield Obedience to the Moral Commands of God ? in a word, to find men who are Religious even to Superfiition, Profane even to Admiration ? Upon all thefe Realons ( and perhaps more ) it may reafonably be concluded, that men are more entlined to Superftition than to Profanenef, and confequeutly, that Profanenefe is not fo common as Superftition. We now proceed to confider the third particular, viz.. How great a fin Superflition is, and fhall find, that altho it be true, that Profaneneis is an odious fin, and fo juftly efteemed by God and Man; yet Superftition is moft Abominable to God, notwithftanding thofe many fpecious pretences that it hath of Angular and fpecial Devotion, which may thus be demonftrated. i. It derogates from the Infinite Wifdom of God, as if he were not wife enough to prefcribe his oWn Worihip: We told you that Superftition wants not fhews of Wifdom to make it plaufible with men, and ( as they think ) well pleafing to God : Now for foolifh man to make himfelf wifer than God in matter of his own Worfhip, as it proceeds from intolerable Pride and Prefumption, fo it cannot but be moft Abominable to God: No King, no Father, no Matter on Earth would fuffer fuch Infolence from their Inferiours, that they fhould take upon them to prefcribe their manner of Service, andfhall the Majefty of the All- wife Jehovah fuffer it ? That which declares the Heavenly Power, and Reveals the deep Myftery of the Golpel, is — T h e fare Jimplicity of the Dodrine, accounted the Foohflmefs of this World j yet croffing K k 2 aad [ 2 < 5 O ] nd confounding the Wifdom of the Flejh; and wherein confifts thisflefhly Wifdom and Pride ? In being altogether ignorant of God nd his Worfhip ? No furely, for men are naturally afham'd of that •, rather then doth it not confift in a bold preemption of Ordering the Worfhip and Service of God after mans own Will, in Traditions and Ceremonies? Now if the Pride and Wifdom of the Flefh were to be defeated and confounded, the fame, no doubt, was efpecially to be done in that very point, wherein it was proudeft, v no ;. Ko i g h t i r felf wife Ft, that lb the Victory of the Gofpel might be the more Iiluftrious. Now by Superfhtion, men inftead of expreffing fuch ipiritual Powe; by warring againft this chief Bulwark and ftrong hold of the Flefh, do enter into faft League with the principal Enemy, and turn the ftretxgth of flefhly Pride and Wifdom againft the pure fimpiicity of Saving Truth ; and thus the more than Angelick brightnefs ofthe Chriftian Religion becomes disfigur'd with the dark overcafting of garifh and trifling Ceremonies ; whence we may gather of how fowl a Nature Superflition is, fincein its natural tendency ' tisdiredly oppofiteto Chriftianity, and endeavours to defeat the principal end of God therein, which is by the mighty wenknefs of the Gofpel to throw down the Wea^ Mightinef of mans Reafoning. 2. It detracts not only from the perfelbion and Truth of Scripture by Addition . to the Rule of Worfhip, but it belyes both the Scripture and God himfelf, making that his Command and a part of Worfhip which is the figment and device of man. Thefalfe Prophets were of old charg'd with Forgery, for faying, Thus faith the Lord, when the Lord hath not fpoken i t; and of Ephraim who was fuperftitious in the Service of God, it is laid, — Ephraim compajfes me about with LYES, Hof. i 2. i. And to the fame purpole is that of Solomon, Prov. 30. 6. Add thou not unto his words left he reprove thee, and thon be found a LYAR, viz. for putting that upon God, as if it were his Word, which is thine own Invention ; as not to believe what God teftifies, is to make him a Lyar, 1 Joh. 5. 10. lb to make him fay what he fayes not, is alio to put upon him a Lye ; now we know how hainous an affront . and offence it is to give the Lye to a man, at leafl our Superiour, how grievous a fin then muft k be to give the Lye to the God of Truth ? 3. Whereas men pretend they do it out of their great Re- Jjrth, [ 261] f p e f f s and Love of God, as thinking nothing too dear, or too much for him ; the truth is, it proceeds from Hatred of God ; this- is evident from the iecond Commandement, where thole that keep Gods Comrnandements, that is, his Prefcriptions of Worfhip, are faid to Love him, but on the contrary thofe that break and tranfgrefs his Commandements either by defe< ft of additions of their own, are faid to Hate him, — Vifiting the fins, & c. upon them that hate me: - Now there is nothing more odious to God or men than Hatred masked under the pretences of Love. 4. It is Idolatry, not only againft the fecond Commandement, Worfhipping God in a falfe manner, but even againft the firft Commandement, either Negatively, not having the true God for our God, or Positively, letting up another God in his ftead. For the firft Commandement requires not only that we have no other God, but alio that we have the true God for our God. But he that Worfhips God in a falfe manner, hath not the true God for his God, nor doth he Worfhip him: This isevident, 2 Kings 17. 32. 34. In the one Verfe it is faid, They feared ( orferved ) the Lord, that is, they intended fo to do; but in the other it is faid. They feared not the Lord-, and the Reafon is rendered, becauie they did not ferve him according to the Law and Commandement which the Lord commanded the Sons of Jacob, & c. And on the other fide, that the Superfluous Worfhipper fets up another God in the flead of the true God, will thus appear, becaufe he fets up Himfelfin tbe ftead of God; and in ferving God, he does but ferve himfelf: This is colledtible from that Speech of God by his Prophet Zech. 7. 5 When youfafted and mourned, & c. did yon faft at all to me ? I fay to me ? When you eat and drankj did you not tat to your [ elves, and drinh^ to your [ elves ? As if he fhould fay, You faftcd to your felves, as well as you did eat and drink to your felves; thole Fafts I required not, you deviled them of your own heads, and obferved them as your o . vn Traditions, and fo in Worfhipping me, you Worfhipped your ielves: and this was in effedt to let up your felves as God. As if a Subject or Servant fhall prefcribe Laws how they will ferve their King or~ Mafter, is notthis to fet up themfelves instead oftheir King and Mailer? So do all Saperftitious. Perfons: they endeavour to pull down'God out of his Throne, aud place themiel ves there [ 2 5 4 ] ; i n ; and under pretence of Worfhipping God, they do but Worfhip themfelves, and the Calves of their own Imaginations, which is moft grofs Idolatry againft the firft Commandement. Laftly, it is the worfi and higheft degree of Idolatry, not only the worfhipping of an Idol, but it is the worfhipping of the Devili, Gods greateft Enemy, inftead of God : This tho it found harfh and ftrange to the Ears of Sttperfiitionifis, is a real Truth, evidenced by the Scriptures in many inftances. The Gentiles firft intended, no doubt, to offer Sacrifices to the true God, the Maker and Preferver of all things, Rom. i . 21. Atts 17. 23. Yet the Apoftle fays expreffely, 1 Cor. 10. 20. The things which the Gentiles offer, they offer to Devils and not , ro God. Aaron and the Ifraelites intended alfo to worfhip the true God, Exod. 32. 5. and therefore proclaimed— Thefe be thy Gods, O Ifrael, vohich brought thee out of Egypt : Yet Levit. 17. 7. they are forbidden to facrifice any more ( as they had done) to Devils. The ten Tribes had the fame good Intentions, 1 Kings 12. 28. yet 2 Chron. 11. 15. It is laid of Jeroboam — He ordained him Priefts— for the DEVILS, and for the Calves which he made; becaufe they worfhipped the true God in a falfe manner, therefore are they declared to be Worfhippers of the Devil. Thus likewife the Papijls that worfhip God in Images of Gold, Silver, Brafs, Stone and Wood, & c. fuppofe they Worfhip the true God; but St. John fays, they Worfhip Devils, Rev. 9. 20. By all which it appears, that however SuperHition makes a fair fhew of Honouring God, and is of high efteem with men, yet it is an hainous Sin, and juftly moft abominable to God ; — which may direft us what Opinion we ought to have of thofe Swarms of Monks, Fryars and Nuns, whole whole Inftitution and courfe of life, , was nothing elfe but a Blendure of Ignorance and Superltition, grofs Impiety, with fpecious Hppocrifte. A D V E R T I S E M E N T . T H i Library of the Reverend. Mr. Whately, near Banbury in Oxford ( hire, together - with tht Library of Phyjtc.^ of Dr. Simon Rutland late 0) Brent- Wood, replenished with variety ofthemofi Modern Phyftc^ Boo^ s, mil be Expofed to Sale by way of Auction at Mr. Bridges Coffee- hou\ e in Popes- head Alley near i the Royal Exchange in Cornhill, the 23d day of April next, 16S 3. Catalogues are diflribated Gratis at the above- mentioned Bridges Coffee- boufe, at Amfterdam Coffie- houfe in Bartholomevv^ lane, Mr. Colliers at the Bible on London- bridge, Mr. Wilkinfon'j at the B! ack- boy in Fleet- ftreet, M-. Mortlacks in Weftminfter- Hall, Booksellers, by Air. Cruttetidcn at the Theater in ( • Oxon, and by Mr. Hicks Bookseller in Cambridge. T H E C 2 6 S 3 f* The C O U R A N T . A further Defcription of the Merits of the JESVITES towards the Church of Rome, by the fame hand. A S when an Image gnawn with Worms hath loft Its Beauty, form, refpeSi and lofty place ; Some cunning hand new trims the rotten poft, Fills up the Worm- holes, paints the rotten face. With choice ft colour s, J pares no Art, nor coft With precious Robes the putrid Trunk to Grace, Circles the Head with Golden Beams that Jhine Like Riflng Sun : The vulgar low Incline, And give away their Souls unto the Block Divine. So do thefe Dedale- worknien plaifter over And fmooth old Rome with Labour d polijhing, So her Defetts- with Art they finely cover, And Cloath and drefs her up with curious Colouring j So every Friend again and every Lover Returns, and dotes, through their neat pandering; They fill her Cup, on Knees drinks Healths to th' Whores „ The drunken Nations pledge it ore and ore, So fpue, and fpuing fall7 and falling rife no mors, Nor Jhall that little Ifle ( our Envy, Spight) Efcape their certain Snares, even there they long Have jhrowded clofe their Heads from dangrous Light j But now more free, dare prefs in open Throng j 2Vw w< rf idle, / wt with praliick^ flight Crept into Houfesgreatf& Wr fugredTongue Made eafy way into the lapfed Breaft Of weaker Sexe, where Lull had built her Neft ; There lay their Cu- ckoe- Egge. s and hatch their brood unbleft » There fowe they Traiterous feed with wicked hand , GainJl God and Aian ; well, thinks their filly Son • To merit Heaven by breaking Gods Command y TV be a Patriot by Rebellion„ Ami And when his hopes are loft, his Life and Land, And he and Wife, and Child are all undone, Then calls for Heaven and Angels, in fiep / , And waft him quick, to Hell: Thus thoufands Dye, Ttt jlill their Children dote; fo fine their Forgery. But nop that Stormy fe a fan's laid; their Spring' And warmer Suns call them from wintry Ceil, Thefe better times will fruit much better bring, Their Labours focn will fill the Barns of Hell With plenteous Store; Serpents, if warm'd, will Sting, And even now they meet and hifs, and fwell: Doubt not fuccefis, for i? i the Name of all, This I dare promife, and make good I Jhall, While they ihus firmly ft and, we cannot wholly fall. This faid, the bold black Spirit invades the day, And Heav'n and Light, and Lord of both defies, All Hell run out and footy flags difplay, Inccnfed Heaven fiats its glorious Eyes, The Stars look, pale, and early Mornings Ray Layes down her Head again and dares not Rife ; Whole Legions of Ill- lpirits the Air poffefl, The frame of Nature Jhrankj> deeply difl- reJI, Fear locks up every Tongue, and horrour fills each Breast. So when the South ( dipping his fable Wings In foaming Waves J [ weeps with bis dropping Eeard, The Air, Earth, and Ocean, down he flings Thi Laden frees-, the Plow- mans hopes new- eaid Swim en the plain, his Lips loud Thunderings And flafhing Eyes, make all the World afeafd, Light with darl^ Clouds, Waters with Fires are met, The Sun but nnv is rifing, now is fee, And finds Weft- jhades in Eaft, and Seas his Golden locks do Wet. A D V E R T I S E M E N T . THere is now Publifhed Rawlsigh Re drum us, or the Life and Death of the Right Honourable Anthony late Earl of Shaftsbury, containing a large and Sucainft Series of Affairs from his Cradle to his Grave : Humbly Dedicated to the Protefting Lords. By Philanax Mifspappas, in Oftavo. Printed for Tho. Malthus at the Sun in the Poultrey. Price Bound, Two Shillings. London, Printed by J. Aftwood, and Entred according to Order, 168}.
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